Why do the same notes sound different in instruments

Sound science: do-re-mi with straws most instruments are capable of producing many different notes—or sizes of sound waves many instruments accomplish this by changing the length of part. Change instrument without changing notes t-bear • jan 17, when i switch instruments, all i want is a different sound for the playback it helps me to hear what i'm arranging, and it helps my quartet learn the music more quickly is this repeatable for you if you repeat the same steps with a brand new score created in 13, do you get. If three musicians using instruments with the different tunings all look at and play the same note on a staff, the tones created will sound different, because the musicians won't be playing tones. If producing a note is so simple, why do the sounds made by each instrument in an orchestra or band sound so different the pitch is the degree of highness or lowness of a musical note the pitch depends on how rapid the vibrations are ie how high the frequency is. Now, why do different instruments have different sounds, despite the same frequency well, because the pure frequency is not everything, the sound is not 1 single wave instruments will produce a multitude of different waves, with different amplitudes, and also having intermediate frequencies.

Music is ordered sound noise is disordered sound the human voice and musical instruments produce sounds by vibration what vibrates determines the type of instrument notes separated by an octave sound similar — like two people with different voices trying to sing the same note. John, from the isle of wight, wrote to me this evening with this rather excellent question: as all sound is simply vibrations in the air, and therefore musical notes are the same, then why do we hear the same note as a different sound when played on different instruments why does an a sharp played on a piano sound different from an a sharp played on a trumpet. Best answer: well, in terms of them vibrating at the same rate for the same note, that's sort of true a-440 is a-440, but it's not that simple when a flute plays a given note, it clearly sounds different from when a violin plays the same note, and the reason for that has to do with several interacting factors. Why do the same notes on a trumpet and on a saxophone sound different when both are played with the same pitch and loudness because in addition to the fundamental frequency each instrument produces a different set of harmonics or overtones at different intensities.

The musical notes sound different because of the way sound is produced on the instrument, the materials that make the instrument, and the techniques used to play the instrument by each individual musician timbre is an abstract concept that takes some getting used to, but it is the reason why musical notes sound different on different instruments. So when you are tuning, you are trying to match the frequency, or vibration, of one note to another if the two pitches you play are at different frequencies, it will produce a beating sound (kind of like wah-wah-wah) which is called interference beats. But there is something that feels fundamentally different about certain pairs of notes that sound “good” together all over the world humans have independently chosen to put the same intervals between notes in their music. That is why, even though all the strings on a guitar are the same length, they all sound a different note string instruments can be plucked, bowed, or in the case of the piano, struck bowing allows very long, sustained notes with interesting dynamics. 1 why do the same notes on a trumpet and on a saxophone sound different when both are played with the same pitch and loudness explain 2, a loudspeaker produces a musical sound by means of the oscillation of a diaphragm.

Sometimes there might be two different instruments such as the guitar and piano, both playing the same note in the same octave at the same time each instrument has a unique sound that it makes in comparison to all other instruments. You will notice there are actually three different notes between a major scale and a natural minor scale which start on the same note (compare the diagrams above) while there are 3 different notes, the essential note giving these scales their major or minor sound quality is the 3rd. Research the instrument and explain how it works in terms of sound production and resonance describe how a musician can vary the pitch and loudness of the notes explain why different types of musical instruments sound different, even though they play the same notes. A beginning violin player sounds very different than a violin player in a symphony, even if they are playing the same note a violin also sounds different than a flute playing the same pitch this is because they have a different tone, or sound quality.

Why do the same notes sound different in instruments

why do the same notes sound different in instruments The same tone is not the same at all we usually think of a tone as the frequency of one sound: the fundamental frequency common to all instruments exemplified here, but every tone is in fact a.

Conceptual physics chapter 21 and 22 #2 study play why do the same notes plucked on a banjo and on guitar have distinctly different sounds both have different amplitude partials when playing the same note, so they have a different quality of sound too. All stringed instruments make sound and notes by vibrating musicians make the strings vibrate by rubbing a bow against them, striking them, or plucking them however, if you were to take a string and stretch it tight and pluck it, it likely would not make a very loud sound it also wouldn't make a. Why do modes sound different (if the notes are the same) (in the same scale) are the same, why do the modes sound so different is it because the intervals are different is is because the progressions in these modes differ from one another if the instrument was tuned in c, the major scale in f, or g would sound slightly different. This means that when they play the same note it is indeed exactly the same note if the two instruments are not in tune with one another it will sound unpleasant because two notes which are very slightly different in pitch will produce a “beat.

  • John asked why the same note sounds different when played on different musical instruments katie haylor spoke to mike newton from the university of edinburgh to find out.
  • Where math meets music ever wonder why some note combinations sound pleasing to our ears, while others make us cringe to understand the answer to this question, you’ll first need to understand the wave patterns created by a musical instrument when you pluck a string on a guitar, it vibrates back and forth.

When we sax players play along with concert pitch instruments such as piano, guitar, violin etc, we must play a different note on our horns for it to come out sounding like the same note the concert pitch instruments play. They are doing things with three sounds that you couldn't do with 15, and that's why they are selling exclusives for $100,000 a pop and you're leasing your tracks off of soundclick for $100 per download. Making sounds with musical instruments by ron kurtus (revised 8 january 2008) the regular vibration of common materials results in sound waves musical instruments create sounds that can be varied in pitch and volume some give off relatively pure tones, while others consist of a pleasing mix of frequencies. Why does the same musical note sound different when played on different instruments why does, for example, an a-sharp on a piano sound different to an a-sharp on a trumpet.

why do the same notes sound different in instruments The same tone is not the same at all we usually think of a tone as the frequency of one sound: the fundamental frequency common to all instruments exemplified here, but every tone is in fact a. why do the same notes sound different in instruments The same tone is not the same at all we usually think of a tone as the frequency of one sound: the fundamental frequency common to all instruments exemplified here, but every tone is in fact a.
Why do the same notes sound different in instruments
Rated 3/5 based on 28 review

2018.